Seeds - Long Coriander

If you like the flavour of coriander, then sawtooth coriander will give you pleasure to grow and use.

HERBAL OF THAILAND > GARDENING > NATURAL > HEALTHIER > GARDEN > LIFE > FITNESS

Seeds - Long Coriander - cilantro 10g

Long Coriander

If you like the flavour of coriander, then sawtooth coriander will give you pleasure to grow and use. The smell and taste is very similar. Long coriander leaves have good potential for drying as it does retain flavour whereas the annual coriander does not keep its flavour when dried.

 

Growing Culantro in a Pot. Select an appropriate pot. Choose a flower pot or container that's at least 50 cm wide and to 25 cm deep. Plant the seeds into the flowerpot. Fill the pot with some fast-draining soil, place them in a sunny or semi-shady spot and keep them moist.

2,50 €

  • 0,03 kg
  • verfügbar / available
  • 8 - 12 Werktage / working days

Seeds - Long Coriander


Shipping information:

Delivery time 1 - 2 weeks.

Only valid for deliveries to Europe and USA.

For deliveries to other countries, the time may vary.


If you like the flavour of coriander, then sawtooth coriander will give you pleasure to grow and use.

Grow your own Culantro.

The best time you plant after frost in the spring, then you can pick individual leaves until summer’s long days. Culantro, will grow out of its rosette, stretching upward with a fast-growing stalk that will bloom and set seeds. If the seeds are allowed to drop into the soil, it may re-seed. Your best is to grow it in early spring and cut off the flower stalk in order to encourage continued leafy growth, rather than flowers.

 

So in milder climates you grow cilantro during summer, in tropical climates you grow it during the cooler dry season. Always grow cilantro from seed,

 

Growing Culantro in a Pot

Select an appropriate pot. Choose a flower pot or container that's at least 50 cm wide and to 25 cm deep. Plant the seeds into the flowerpot. Fill the pot with some fast-draining soil, place them in a sunny or semi-shady spot and keep them moist.

 

Long Coriander

If you like the flavour of coriander, then sawtooth coriander will give you pleasure to grow and use. The smell and taste is very similar. Long coriander leaves have good potential for drying as it does retain flavour whereas the annual coriander does not keep its flavour when dried.

 

Culantro has been used in folklore medicine for a variety of ailments, from upper respiratory complaints to gastric upsets. In the kitchen, use the leaves in Thai, Vietnamese dishes. You can try the chopped leaves for salads, soups, sauces, curries and particularly fish dishes.

Long Coriander

Long Coriander If you like the flavour of coriander, then sawtooth coriander will give you pleasure to grow and use.

Long Coriander, Eryngium foetidum is a tropical perennial and annual herb in the family Apiaceae. Its scientific Latin name literally translates as "foul-smelling thistle". Common names include culantro, Mexican coriander and long coriander. It is native to Mexico and South America, but is cultivated worldwide. In the United States, where it is not well known outside Latino and Caribbean communities, the name culantro sometimes causes confusion with Coriandrum sativum (also in Apiaceae), the leaves of which are known as cilantro, and of which culantro is said to taste like a stronger version.

Used plant part
Fresh leaves. The plant forms two types of leaves: The rosette consists of up to 10 long leaves with palatable texture, while leaves on the stalks are smaller and tougher. The bracts enshrouding the flower heads are almost woody and somewhat spiny; they can hardly be eaten, unless puréd.


Long coriander belongs to the same plant family as coriander, but the plant’s shape does not bear much resemblance. Yet the long, tough leaves exemanate a fragrance very much similar to coriander’s aroma and thus suggest themselves as a substitute or alternative for the former.


Culinary
Long coriander’s usage concentrates on the Far East and Central America. In Asia, it is most popular in the countries of the South East Asian peninsular. In Thailand, Malaysia and Singapore it is commonly used together with or in place of coriander and topped over soups, noodle dishes and curries. It can also be used for Thai curry pastes (see coconut), especially, when coriander roots are not available.


Long coriander is of some importance in the cooking of Vietnam, where fresh herbs are of chief importance (see Vietnamese coriander). Long coriander is often used as a fully equivalent substitute for the much-loved coriander leaves to decorate soups and stir-fries; occasionally, the largest leaves are used to wrap food bits in them.


In South Asia, long coriander is rarely used and not much known; yet it is a common household garden plants in the Hill Area of Nepal, as it tolerates the mountain climate better than true coriander does. I found it also in the South Indian Cardamom Hills, where it is grown as an Ayurvedic plant. There is only one region where it is a common culinary herb: The mountains of the extreme North-East, where culinary habits show a lot of South East Asian influence. See chameleon plant for details.

Seeds - Long Coriander

Cilantro needs a frost free period to grow but it doesn't like extreme heat. So in milder climates you grow cilantro during summer, in tropical climates you grow it during the cooler dry season.