Natural soap - Cinnamon

This sweet soap provides warmth for body and mind. Winter Soap.

Warm well-being and the smell of cinnamon.

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Natural soap - Cinnamon

Cinnamon

  • 100% Organic Thai soap
  • All soaps are handmade.
  • Are natural materials and plant extracts are used for producing exclusively. No additives, no animal fats.
  • Weight per soap about 80-100 grams

2,90 €

  • 0,12 kg
  • verfügbar / available
  • 8 - 12 Werktage / working days

Natural soap - Cinnamon


Shipping information:

Delivery time 1 - 2 weeks.

Only valid for deliveries to Europe and USA.

For deliveries to other countries, the time may vary.


Cinnamon

Cinnamon soap - This sweet soap provides warmth for body and mind. Winter Soap.  Warm well-being and the smell of cinnamon.

This sweet soap provides warmth for body and mind. Winter Soap.

Warm well-being and the smell of cinnamon.

 

Cinnamon

Cinnamon is a spice obtained from the inner bark of several tree species from the genus Cinnamomum. Cinnamon is used in both sweet and savoury foods. The term "cinnamon" also refers to its mid-brown colour.

Cinnamomum verum is sometimes considered to be "true cinnamon", but most cinnamon in international commerce is derived from related species, also referred to as "cassia" to distinguish them from "true cinnamon".

 

Name

The English word "cinnamon", attested in English since the 15th century, derives from the Greek κιννάμωμον kinnámōmon (later kínnamon), via Latin and medieval French intermediate forms. The Greek was borrowed from a Phoenician word, which was akin to the related Hebrew qinnamon.

 

Cinnamon has been known from remote antiquity. It was imported to Egypt as early as 2000 BCE, but those who report it had come from China confuse it with cassia.Cinnamon was so highly prized among ancient nations that it was regarded as a gift fit for monarchs and even for a god; a fine inscription records the gift of cinnamon and cassia to the temple of Apollo at Miletus. Though its source was kept mysterious in the Mediterranean world for centuries by the middlemen who handled the spice trade, to protect their monopoly as suppliers, cinnamon is native to Bangladesh, Sri Lanka, the Malabar Coast of India, and Burma.

 

The first Greek reference to kasia is found in a poem by Sappho in the seventh century BCE. According to Herodotus, both cinnamon and cassia grew in Arabia, together with incense, myrrh, and ladanum, and were guarded by winged serpents. The phoenix was reputed to build its nest from cinnamon and cassia. Herodotus mentions other writers who believed the source of cassia was the home of Dionysos, located somewhere east or south of Greece.

 

Brain Benefits of Cinnamon

Did you know that to the ancient Egyptians, cinnamon was worth more than gold? That’s because cinnamon was long believed to have healthful and medicinal properties that made it extremely valuable. Cinnamon is excellent for brain health and some rigorous studies have found a variety of neurological benefits that cinnamon offers. Here are 5 proven brain benefits of cinnamon.

  • Cinnamon may delay or reverse cognitive impairment. A study in rats found that cinnamon improved cognition and reduced oxidation in the brain.
  • Cinnamon may be beneficial for Parkinson’s patients. A mouse study found that cinnamon protected dopamine production systems and improved motor function in Parkinson’s disease.
  • Cinnamon may curb food cravings. By targeting a brain chemical involved in glucose and cholesterol, eating cinnamon may decrease food intake and help you lose weight.
  • Cinnamon’s scent can boost memory in a task. A small human study suggests that merely smelling cinnamon can improve performance several types of memory tasks.
  • Cinnamon is a good source of the powerful antioxidant manganese. Two teaspoons of cinnamon provides about half the RDA of manganese, a powerful antioxidant that is crucial for brain and body health.

Traditional medicine

Cinnamon has a long history of use in traditional medicine. It contains several bioactive compounds with possible health effects, but there is no scientific evidence that cinnamon can treat medical conditions.

 

Flavour, aroma, and taste

The flavour of cinnamon is due to an aromatic essential oil that makes up 0.5 to 1% of its composition. This essential oil is prepared by roughly pounding the bark, macerating it in sea water, and then quickly distilling the whole. It is of a golden-yellow colour, with the characteristic odour of cinnamon and a very hot aromatic taste. The pungent taste and scent come from cinnamaldehyde and, by reaction with oxygen as it ages, it darkens in colour and forms resinous compounds. Other chemical components of the essential oil include ethyl cinnamate, eugenol, beta-caryophyllene, linalool, and methyl chavicol.

 

Cinnamon bark

Besides use as flavourant and spice in foods, cinnamon-flavoured tea, also flavoured with cardamom, is consumed as a hot beverage in Bangladesh, India, and Pakistan.

 

Use as an alcohol flavourant

Cinnamon is a popular flavouring in numerous alcoholic beverages, such as Fireball Cinnamon Whisky and Jack Daniel's Tennessee Fire. There are many similar products throughout the world

Natural soap - Cinnamon