A mild soap - The ideal everyday soap.

Natural soap, Turnip - from controlled organic cultivation.

Natural soap, Turnip - A mild soap with ingredients from controlled organic cultivation. The ideal everyday soap.
Natural soap, Turnip - A mild soap with ingredients from controlled organic cultivation. The ideal everyday soap.

 

Natural soap, Turnip - A mild soap with ingredients from controlled organic cultivation. The ideal everyday soap.

 

 

Turnip

 

The turnip or white turnip (Brassica rapa subsp. rapa) is a root vegetable commonly grown in temperate climates worldwide for its white, bulbous taproot.

 

Small, tender varieties are grown for human consumption, while larger varieties are grown as feed for livestock.

 

In the north of England and Scotland, and eastern Canada (Newfoundland), turnip (or neep; the word turnip is an old compound of tur- as in turned/rounded on a lathe and neep, derived from Latin napus) often refers to the larger, yellow rutabaga root vegetable, also known as the "swede" (from "Swedish turnip").

 

Nutrition

The turnip's root is high in vitamin C. The green leaves of the turnip top ("turnip greens") are a good source of vitamin A, folate, vitamin C, vitamin K and calcium. Turnip greens are also high in lutein (8.5 mg / 100 g).

 

Like rutabaga, turnip contains bitter cyanoglucosides that release small amounts of cyanide. Sensitivity to the bitterness of these cyanoglucosides is controlled by a paired gene. Subjects who have inherited two copies of the "sensitive" gene find turnips twice as bitter as those who have two "insensitive" genes, thus may find turnips and other cyanoglucoside-containing foods intolerably bitter.

 

History

The first known printed reference to the turnip comes from the Swiss botanist Gaspard Bauhin in 1620, where he notes that it was growing wild in Sweden. It is often considered to have originated in Scandinavia or Russia. It is said to have been widely introduced to Britain around 1800, but it was recorded as being present in the royal gardens in England as early as 1669 and was described in France in 1700. It was asserted by Sir John Sinclair in his Husbandry of Scotland to have been introduced to Scotland around 1781–1782.[citation needed] An article on the topic in The Gardeners' Chronicle suggests that the rutabaga was then introduced more widely to England in 1790. Introduction to North America came in the early 19th century with reports of rutabaga crops in Illinois as early as 1817.

 

Botanical history

Turnip has a complex taxonomic history. The earliest account comes from the Swiss botanist Gaspard Bauhin, who wrote about it in his 1620 Prodromus. Brassica napobrassica was first validly published by Carl Linnaeus in his 1753 work Species Plantarum as a variety of B. oleracea: B. oleracea var. napobrassica. It has since been moved to other taxa as a variety, subspecies, or elevated to species rank. In 1768, a Scottish botanist elevated Linnaeus' variety to species rank as Brassica napobrassica in The Gardeners Dictionary, which is the currently accepted name.

Natural soap, Turnip - A mild soap with ingredients from controlled organic cultivation. The ideal everyday soap.